History

History

History of Sigma Theta Tau International



In 1922, six students from the Graduate School of Nursing at the University of Indiana in Indianapolis, were interested in creating a brotherhood to recognize and encourage scholarship for his high achievement. These six students who conceptualized the nursing honor society were: Dorothy Garrigus Adams, Elizabeth Russell Belford, Edith Moore Copeland, Marie Hippensteel Lingeman, Elizabeth McWilliams Miller and Mary Tolle Wright.

During the command for the second director, Ethel Palmer Clarke (1915-1931), the medical center grew to include a residence for nursing students. In 1922, six nursing students who were interested in creating a brotherhood managed to form an organization. The students motivated by the realization that there was no system of recognition of merit and scholarship, laid the foundation for a society to recognize their achievements. The first induction ceremony for the Alpha Chapter of STTI was held on October 16, 1922.
 
Dorothy Ford Buschmann assumed responsibility for the continuous expansion STTI. His vision to enlarge the organization by inducing new chapters nationwide STTI kept moving forward. The biggest barrier to the expansion of STTI is the fact that there were very few nursing colleges in the United States. The Convention of 1929, STTI had two chapters: Alpha nursing school at the University of Indiana and Beta Washington University in St. Louis.
 
In order to obtain the recognition of national acceptance, STTI sought ways to demonstrate their value to their members. The leaders of the organization fought to prove his place in a fraternity, STTI existed as an honor society committed to scholarship and educational improvement. Prior to this time, no research nurses received many awards from other representations of research in the medical profession. Believing in the continued commitment of the mission of the society and the advancement of nursing research and nursing educational improvement, STTI members voted to create a foundation for nursing research grants. In 1936, the Company granted the first nursing research fellowship in the nation.
 
In 1946, STTI was only six chapters and national expansion vision seemed more distant. However, the end of World War II brought some changes to the infirmary. The number of nursing colleges experienced a dramatic increase and showed the most significant change to the STTI. With this increase, STTI entered the 1950s with more opportunity to indoctrinate new members of the chapter.
 
These problems promoted teamwork for future success. The leaders recognized their shortcomings, and began looking for ways to implement changes to meet the needs of a growing population of nurse. The leaders saw the importance of administering to STTI as a business and the organization moved away completely from the beginning of a fraternity.